“Shepherd Like this”



What does it mean to “shepherd” a flock? Perhaps many think of the ultimate sacrifice: Laying down ones life for the sheep. And this is noble and good and best. However, what does it mean to shepherd the flock in the “in-between time”?


Before we address this, I’d like to note: I do believe our main text directly applies to those who have been entrusted with the flock of the Church; to pastors (elders, leaders, bishops, overseers) who are to shepherd the Lord’s people with such devotion. However, I think you would agree that this can also apply to heads of families who have been entrusted with precious sheep to shepherd as well. With this in mind, let us look at what it means to shepherd such a flock….

We guard them from predators; feed and clothe them; provide a safe nurturing environment in which to grow and mature; dress their little bodies, their bumps and bruises and their hurt feelings. We are a hand when they need help up, an ear when they are confused or learning, and a heart when they are hurting. We are there for them….

Basically, we do all the “things” the Lord Jesus does for us as He shepherds us. But why does He do this? Why do you do this? Because He is madly in Love with us! Francis Chan calls this “Crazy Love,” and it is! It doesn’t make sense. Why would He Love us? Yet He does!

And when we emulate—model—this “crazy” Love, we pass it on to our flock. They may not get “it” at first, but keep it up. Why? Because we are “madly in Love with them.”

Your spouse, your children, your grandchildren will feel safe, nurtured, comforted when they are hugged with a “Crazy Love”!

What are some ways we can demonstrate that we are madly in Love with our flock?  Your thoughts….

Main Text— Acts 20:28 (NIV84)— 28 Keep watch over yourselves and all the flock of which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers. Be shepherds of the church of God, which he bought with his own blood.

Additional Scriptures to Renew Your Thoughts

Be shepherds of God’s flock that is under your care, serving as overseers—not because you must, but because you are willing, as God wants you to be; not greedy for money, but eager to serve; 3 not lording it over those entrusted to you, but being examples to the flock.— 1 Peter 5:2–3 (NIV84)

I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. … I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me.— John 10:11, 14 (NIV84)

This is what the Sovereign LORD says: Woe to the shepherds of Israel who only take care of themselves! Should not shepherds take care of the flock? You eat the curds, clothe yourselves with the wool and slaughter the choice animals, but you do not take care of the flock. You have not strengthened the weak or healed the sick or bound up the injured. You have not brought back the strays or searched for the lost. You have ruled them harshly and brutally.— Ezekiel 34:2b–4 (NIV84)

Lord Jesus Christ, be the shepherd in my Life so that I might demonstrate Your Crazy Love and Kindness to the flock You have entrusted to me. In Your Name, Amen!

Pastor Mike


“Are Comfort Zones So Bad?”


Maybe you’ve heard many a success-trainer or life coach tell you to “Get out of your comfort zone.” “Stretch your legs and move out.” “Without risk there can be no growth” (Bear Grylls). “Face your fears and do what you fear most” (Priya Deelchand).  “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”(Neale Donald Walsch). And the like….

Comfort Zone

But are comfort zones really so bad? Let’s face it: there are some good things about comforts zones. And the first one I can think of is, well, they are comfortable. I know what to expect. No surprises. Another is they are safe. I am protected in my comfort zone from the wiles of the world. Really, a comfort zone can also be a “no danger zone,” eh?

What else is good about a comfort zone? I’m sure you can think of many, many more ‘good things’ about a comfort zone. So, then why leave the comfort and security and safety of a comfort zone? Is the risk worth the growth?

In our main text this morning (see below), we find Philip moving out of his comfort zone. Or shall we say, “shoved?” His comfort zone composed of a cushy job delivering food to widows and attending to the needs of the poor. But suddenly life caved it. His friend and fellow helper, Stephen, gets stoned (Acts 7:57-60), and a persecution of those who believe in Jesus  “broke out”. His comfort zone collapsed! Oh, he probably had a choice to stay and attempt to protect it—rebuild it, but instead Philip did something counterintuitive: Instead of looking for another cushy job and rebuilding another comfort zone, he went to Samaria and proclaimed there the good news that Jesus is the Messiah. …

Now, for the average first century Jewish inhabitant of Judea, Samaria was anything but a “comfort zone” (see John 4:9 for a brief explanation). Nevertheless, Philip continued outside his comfort zone. And it doing so he encountered great success. Why? Because his answer to the question, “Is the risk worth the growth” was “Yes!” And it wasn’t so much his personal growth that Philip was focused on, but rather—and more importantly—the growth of His Master’s Kingdom through the church.

Maybe now you may have some different answers to the other question: “Are comfort zones bad?” Your thoughts?

Main Text: — Acts 8:1–5 (NIV84)—  On that day a great persecution broke out against the church at Jerusalem, and all except the apostles were scattered throughout Judea and Samaria.  Godly men buried Stephen and mourned deeply for him.  But Saul began to destroy the church. Going from house to house, he dragged off men and women and put them in prison. Philip in Samaria  Those who had been scattered preached the word wherever they went.  Philip went down to a city in Samaria and proclaimed the Christ there.

Additional Scriptures to Renew Your Thoughts

 If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple. And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.— Luke 14:26–27 (NIV84)

I tell you the truth,” Jesus said to them, “no one who has left home or wife or brothers or parents or children for the sake of the kingdom of God will fail to receive many times as much in this age and, in the age to come, eternal life.”— Luke 18:29–30 (NIV84)

Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. — 2 Corinthians 4:16–18 (NIV84)

Heavenly Father, sometimes I need a gentle shove to get me out of my comfort zone. In Your Grace and Mercy, open my eyes to the greater glory that is in You. As You empower me by the Life of the Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen each step out of my comfort zone and into for Your pleasing and perfect will.  In Jesus’ Name,  Amen.

Coach Mike